Save Money, Time and Lives
by Becoming a High Reliability Organization

Are you on your way?

Phases in the Journey

Avoid Penalties

A high reliability organization (HRO) avoids errors and system failures, which can lead to payment penalties. Premier can help you identify gaps in your standardization of processes. 

Earn Reimbursement

Effective HRO practices can offer significant upside bonus rewards. Our experts can implement your strategic plan to quickly help affecting your bottom line.

Predict Payment

Forecasting the financial impact of future reimbursements can help providers prioritize improvement areas and sustain HRO improvements over time. We can help you become sustainable.

Results

$18B Saved

Premier’s collaborative approach to high reliability has saved nearly
$18 billion and over 200,000 lives..

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Top Rated

Recognized for the second year in a row as the highest overall rated organization in KLAS's broad healthcare specific category.

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Five Questions to Unlock Your Potential

Question #1:

Patient and family engagement: Are patients and families involved in your organization’s improvement through committee membership or an active Patient/Family Advisory Council?  

You chose ANSWER A:
Not yet 

 of respondents rated their organization the same way.

YOUR TIP:

Organizations beginning their journey to high reliability often have limited patient and family engagement. An example of this is a visitor policy which restricts and/or enforces visiting hours for families. Do you see this in your organization?

Next Question

Question #1:

Patient and family engagement: Are patients and families involved in your organization’s improvement through committee membership or an active Patient/Family Advisory Council?  

You chose ANSWER B:
Yes

 of respondents rated their organization the same way.

YOUR TIP:

Good. At this point you should have an established Patient/Family Advisory Council serving as a sounding board for organizational care process changes. How long has your council been around? Have you considered how you can integrate members of your Patient/Family Advisory Council into other councils?

Next Question

Question #1:

Patient and family engagement: Are patients and families involved in your organization’s improvement through committee membership or an active Patient/Family Advisory Council?  

You chose
ANSWER C:

Absolutely

 of respondents rated their organization the same way.

YOUR TIP:

Superstar! Organizations that focus on continuous improvement often include former patients and/or caregivers as participants in performance improvement efforts, sometimes even as full members on an organizational Quality Council or committee. At this point, patient/caregiver viewpoints are considered in all process improvement efforts.

Next Question

Question #2:

Robust process improvement: Are staff and leaders at your organization trained in process improvement methodologies including LEAN techniques and project management skills?

You chose ANSWER A:
Not yet

 of respondents rated their organization the same way.

YOUR TIP:

Watch out! Organizations lacking formalized training for staff regarding Plan-Do-Study-Act Cycle models or similar are heading for trouble. A common sign of this is improvement returning to previous levels after six months, or less, of process improvements.

Next Question

Question #2:

Robust process improvement: Are staff and leaders at your organization trained in process improvement methodologies including LEAN techniques and project management skills?

You chose ANSWER B:
Yes

 of respondents rated their organization the same way.

YOUR TIP:

Nice, you’re heading in the right direction! But before we get too excited, let’s pulse check. Have you answered “yes” because you have a process improvement team or quality department that has had training in process improvement models and LEAN techniques? Does your organization have formal requirements for certification?


Process improvement projects backed by formal training see at least 50 percent improvement in their efforts after six months.

Next Question

Question #2:

Robust process improvement: Are staff and leaders at your organization trained in process improvement methodologies including LEAN techniques and project management skills?

You chose ANSWER C:
Absolutely

 of respondents rated their organization the same way.

YOUR TIP:

Dreaming about vehicle manufactures’ best practices in your sleep? High reliability organizations require managers and directors to achieve at least green belt status within their first year of employment and to complete a LEAN project on a defined basis.


The result of these requirements? Improvements in performance last longer than 18 months.

 

Yep, you read that right - 18 months! How many improvements in your organization have lasted longer than 18 months?

Next Question

Question #3:

Culture: Does your organization promote a culture of
speaking up without fear of retribution?

You chose ANSWER A:
Not yet

 of respondents rated their organization the same way.

YOUR TIP:

Even prime time medical dramas highlight that speaking up is not okay. We understand the challenges associated with culture change, but, every organization needs to start somewhere.


A good place to start is with baseline data and continuous surveys. You may see declining staff participation rates the more surveys you conduct. That’s ok. The only way to improve is to truly understand where you’re starting from.

Next Question

Question #3:

Culture: Does your organization promote a culture of
speaking up without fear of retribution?

You chose ANSWER B:
Yes

 of respondents rated their organization the same way.

YOUR TIP:

You’re not giving up. You recognize that culture changes don’t happen overnight.


Your organization has moved beyond basic data collection and is now completing root cause analyses and investigations of serious events. This has likely revealed process or system problems known to staff and have been previously reported—but, an important note here - not acted on.

Next Question

Question #3:

Culture: Does your organization promote a culture of
speaking up without fear of retribution?

You chose ANSWER C:
Absolutely

 of respondents rated their organization the same way.

YOUR TIP:

You’ve read all the articles on clinician and physician burnout and you’ve implemented process changes. Your organization has adopted a strong culture and now your hard work has paid off.


Culture surveys of high reliability organizations reveal top decile engagement scores supported by best practice retention and turnover rates for key positions, including RN’s.

Next Question

Question #4:

High reliability focus: Does your organization inform all employees of errors and near-misses, including event analysis, trend identification, and action steps to guide improvement activities?

You chose ANSWER A:
Not yet

 of respondents rated their organization the same way.

YOUR TIP:

Organizations beginning their high reliability journey are using root cause analysis and failure mode effects analysis for retrospective and prospective analysis. But, at the early stages, they still don’t know if process recommendations have been implemented and sustained for longer than six months.

Next Question

Question #4:

High reliability focus: Does your organization inform all employees of errors and near-misses, including event analysis, trend identification, and action steps to guide improvement activities?

You chose ANSWER B:
Yes

 of respondents rated their organization the same way.

YOUR TIP:

In the game of hot and cold, you’re getting warmer!


Organizations at levels similar to yours are using root cause analysis to only investigate serious events and are seeing process improvement activities with results stable for longer than six months.

Next Question

Question #4:

High reliability focus: Does your organization inform all employees of errors and near-misses, including event analysis, trend identification, and action steps to guide improvement activities?

You chose ANSWER C:
Absolutely

 of respondents rated their organization the same way.

YOUR TIP:

Congratulations! It looks like you’re starting to see true culture change.


At this point, root cause analysis (RCA) is widely used as an analysis tool beyond serious events. RCA’s are compiled and compared to identify themes across event types. The identification of themes has also resulted in system changes and a reduction in events and near misses. Your organization is likely using failure mode effects analysis to mostly evaluate new processes and services well beyond minimum regulatory requirements. Keep up the good work!

Next Question

 

Question #5:

Executive leadership buy-in: Has your organization’s board adopted high reliability or zero defects as an organizational imperative?

You chose ANSWER A:
Not yet

 of respondents rated their organization the same way.

YOUR TIP:

Organization’s beginning their journey to high reliability need executive leadership alignment. Cultural shifts, such as becoming a high reliability organization, begin and end with leadership.


The governing board needs to establish patient safety as a priority. Then, board-level strategic engagement efforts should extend beyond routine reporting on error and harm only.

Finish

 

Question #5:

Executive leadership buy-in: Has your organization’s board adopted high reliability or zero defects as an organizational imperative?

You chose ANSWER B:
Yes

 of respondents rated their organization the same way.

YOUR TIP:

Yes? What does “yes” really mean? Is it intent or action? By the way, both are great.


At this point, your organization’s governing board has already established patient safety as a key goal. Now, board-level strategic engagement in these efforts has extended beyond routine reporting on error and harm. In fact, the governing board has requested information about high reliability and is interested in learning about how your organization performs compared to others.


Do you know how your organization performs compared to other high reliability organizations?”

Finish

 

Question #5:

Executive leadership buy-in: Has your organization’s board adopted high reliability or zero defects as an organizational imperative?

You chose ANSWER C:
Absolutely

 of respondents rated their organization the same way.

YOUR TIP:

Yes! We love the passionate “absolutely” answer because passionate leadership is what makes high reliability organizations successful. It’s what helps ensure that the governing board has established high reliability or “zero defects” as an organizational priority and has resourced this through board education and training.


More importantly, organizations achieving high reliability are doing so because the governing board has adopted an organizational roadmap with measureable milestones for achievement.

Finish

Wow, you’re done! That was easy. right? Or, not.

 See what your answers tell you about your organization.

*Disclaimer; Terms and Conditions: The assessment responses are a part of Sponsor’s unique thought leadership and cumulative experience, and are opinions, given for educational and informational purposes only. Statements which are not historical in nature are “forward-looking” and/or predictive in nature and reflect opinions at the time of the statement. Statements shall not be construed as legal or other advice.  Assessment Participants must be to legal residents of the 50 United States and Washington, D.C., who, as of the date of entry, are 18 years of age or older, or the age of majority in their state of residence, are employed in the field of healthcare in the U.S. and who are not restricted from participating by contractual or other applicable restrictions.  The sponsor and administrator of this assessment is Premier, Inc. 13034 Ballantyne Corporate Pl, Charlotte, NC 28277 (“Sponsor”). For all Terms and Conditions, including privacy and data usage, click here